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References

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2020

A unifying framework disentangles genetic, epigenetic, and stochastic sources of drug-response variability in an in vitro model of tumor heterogeneity.

Hayford C E1 et al.

1Chemical and Physical Biology Graduate Program, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Tumor heterogeneity; Drug-response; Mutated oncogene; Targeted therapy response; Phenotypic states; Nuclei count; 

DOI:10.1101/2020.06.05.136119

 

Characterization of a dual BET/HDAC inhibitor for treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Zhang X1,2 et al.

1Institute for Developmental Cancer Therapeutics, West German Cancer Center, University Medicine Essen, Germany.

2Division of Solid Tumor Translational Oncology, German Cancer Consortium (DKTK, partner site University Hospital Essen) and German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC); BET inhibitor; HDAC inhibitor; Combined therapy; Dual BET/HDAC inhibitor; Proliferation assay

DIO:10.1002/ijc.33137

 

Characterization of CRISPR/Cas9 RANKL knockout mesenchymal stem cell clones based on single-cell printing technology and emulsion coupling assay as a low-cellularity workflow for single-cell cloning.

Gross T1 et al.

1Laboratory for MEMSApplications, IMTEK-Department of MicrosystemsEngineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee103, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany

KEYWORDS:

CRISPR/Cas9; f.sight; Cytena; Single-cell isolation; Gene editing; Transfection efficiency; High-throughput; Fluorescent single cell cloning (SCC); Colony growth monitoring

DIO:10.1101/2020.08.17.253559

 

Cyto-Mine: An Integrated, Picodroplet System for High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis, Sorting, Dispensing, and Monoclonality Assurance.

Josephides D1, Hinchliffe M2 et al.

1Sphere Fluidics Ltd., Cambridge, UK.

2UCB, Slough, Berkshire, UK.

KEYWORDS:

High producer identification; CHO-cells; SCC; Brightfield & fluorescence; High-throughput screening (HTS); Microfluidics; Microtechnology; Monoclonality; Picodroplet; Colony outgrowth

DOI:10.1177/2472630319892571

 

f.sight™| Streamlined Workflow for the Generation of CRISPR-edited Mesenchymal Stem Cell Clones for Regenerative Medicine Applications.

Gross T1, Sinkala E2, Zimmerman S1

1Laboratory for MEMS Applications, IMTEK-Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Germany

2cytena GmbH, Neuer Messplatz 3, Freiburg, Germany

KEYWORDS:

CRISPR/Cas9; f.sight; Cytena; Single-cell isolation; Gene editing; Transfection efficiency; High-throughput; Fluorescent single cell cloning (FASCC); Colony growth monitoring

APPNOTE:www.cytena.com

 

Functional miRNA Screening Identifies Wide-ranging Antitumor Properties of miR-3622b-5p and Reveals a New Therapeutic Combination Strategy in Ovarian Tumor Organoids.

Vernon M1 et al.

1Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, Inserm U1086 ANTICIPE (Interdisciplinary Research Unit for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer), Biology and Innovative Therapies of Ovarian Cancers (BioTICLA), Caen, France.

KEYWORDS:

Ovarian tumor organiods; Chemoresistance; Cellular morphology; High-content imaging; High-throughput; Cytotoxic miRNAs 

DOI:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-19-0510 

 

High-Throughput Quantification and Glycosylation Analysis of Antibodies Using Bead-Based Assays.

Giehring S1

1PAIA Biotech GmbH, Cologne, D-51105, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

PAIAplate; IgG; Cell line development (CLD); Fc and Fab glycosylation; High-throughput assays; Lectins; Monoclonal antibodies (mAB); Product quality; Titer assay; Bead-based assays; Bioprocess development

DOI:10.1007/978-1-0716-0191-4_15

 

Isolation and Enumeration of CTC in Colorectal Cancer Patients: Introduction of a Novel Cell Imaging Approach and Comparison to Cellular and Molecular Detection Techniques.

Hendricks A1Brandt B2Geisen R3Dall K1Röder C4Schafmayer C1Becker T1Hinz S1Sebens S4

1Department of General, Visceral, Thoracic, Transplantation and Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Germany.

2Institute of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Germany.

3ORGA Labormanagement GmbH, Ochtrup, Germany.

4Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, Kiel University and University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

NYONE®; ScreenCell®; Circulating tumour cells; Colorectal cancer; Isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells; Liquid biopsy.

DOI:10.3390/cancers12092643

 

Loss of ARF/INK4A Promotes Liver Progenitor Cell Transformation Toward Tumorigenicity Supporting Their Role in Hepatocarcinogenesis.

Strauss RP1 et al.

1School of Molecular Sciences, The University of Western AustraliaCrawley, WAAustralia.

KEYWORDS:

Liver progenitor cells (LPCs); ARF; INK4A; CDKN2A; Liver cancer; High-throughput imaging; Automated image analysis; Fluorescent proliferation assay

DOI:10.3727/105221620X15874935364268 

 

Mitochondrial DNA: Hotspot for Potential Gene Modifiers Regulating Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

Kargaran PK1, Kargaran PK1Evans JM2Bodbin SE3Smith JGW4Nelson TJ5Denning C3, Mosqueira D3

1Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

2Department of Health Science Research, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

3Division of Cancer and Stem Cells, Biodiscovery Institute, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

4Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.

5Division of General Internal Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Departments of Medicine, Molecular Pharmacology, and Experimental Therapeutics, Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); Disease modeling; Gene modifiers; High-content imaging; High-throughput; Haplogroups; Isogenic human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes; Mitochondrial DNA; Nuclei count

DOI:10.3390/jcm9082349 

 

Natural antioxidant pterostilbene as an effective antibiofilm agent, particularly for gram-positive cocci.

Vaňková E1 et al.

1University of Chemistry and Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Prague, Czech Republic.

KEYWORDS:

Pterostilbene (PTE); Adhesion; Biofilm; Cell adhesion; Percentages of colonized area; Antibiofilm; Biofilm inhibition; Eradication; Gram-positive cocci; Pterostilbene

DOI:10.1007/s11274-020-02876-5 

 

Plant-derived saccharides and their inhibitory potential on metastasis associated cellular processes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

Schöll-Naderer M1Helm O1 Spencker J2 Pfeifer L2 Rätsch T1 Sebens S1Classen B

1Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, University of Kiel and University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

2Pharmaceutical Institute, Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, University of Kiel, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Arabinogalactan; Galectin-3; Liver metastases; Pancreatic cancer; Pectin; Polysaccharide; Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC); SiRNA knockdown; Automated wound closure monitoring; Scratch assay

DOI:10.1016/j.carres.2019.107903 

 

Rational optimization of a monoclonal antibody improves the aggregation propensity and enhances the CMC properties along the entire pharmaceutical process chain.

Bauer J1 et al.

1Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Early Stage Pharmaceutical Development, Pharmaceutical Development Biologicals, Biberach/Riss, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

In silico; CMC properties; Antibody engineering; Bioinformatic; Biotherapeutic development; Pharmaceutical industry; Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs); Microscopic investigation; Proof of monoclonality, CHO cells; Cell growth; High-throughput imaging; 384-well plate

DOI:10.1080/19420862.2020.1787121 

 

Targeting activated PI3K/mTOR signaling overcomes acquired resistance to CDK4/6-based therapies in preclinical models of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

O'Brien NA1McDermott MSJ1Dylan Conklin1Luo T1 Raul Ayala1 Salgar S1Chau K1DiTomaso E2,3Babbar N2, Su F  2, Gaither A2,4Hurvitz SA1, Linnartz R2Rose K2 Samit Hirawat S2,5Slamon DJ6,7 

1Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

2Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA, USA.

3Bayer Pharmaceuticals, Boston, MA, USA.

4LG Life Sciences, Cambridge, MA, USA.

5Bristol Myers Squibb, Lawrenceville, NJ, USA.

6Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

7UCLA Translational Oncology, Santa Monica, CA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Alpelisib; Palbociclib; Translational; CDK4/6; Activated PI3K/mTOR signaling; ER+/HER2-; High-throughput target screening; In vitro proliferation assays; Drug combination studies; IC50; EFM19-PR cells

DOI:10.1186/s13058-020-01320-8 

 

Transfection of hPSC-Cardiomyocytes Using Viafect™ Transfection Reagent.

Bodbin SE1Denning C1 & Mosqueira D1

1Division of Cancer and Stem Cells, Biodiscovery Institute, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

KEYWORDS:

Disease modelling; Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs); Transfection efficiency; ViafectTM; High content imaging system

DOI:10.3390/mps3030057 

 

2019

A Deleted Deletion Site in a New Vector Strain and Exceptional Genomic Stability of Plaque-Purified Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA).

Jordan I1, Horn D2, Thiele K2,3  et al.

1+2ProBioGen AG, Herbert-Bayer-Straße 8, 13086, Berlin, Germany.

3Sartorius Stedim Cellca GmbH, Erwin-Rentschler-Str 21, 88471, Laupheim, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA); MVA-CR19; CR.pIX; Suspension cell line; Vaccine production; Genome stability

DOI:10.1007/s12250-019-00176-3

 

Cyt-Geist: Current and Future Challenges in Cytometry: Reports of the CYTO 2018 Conference Workshops.

Czechowska K et al.1

1Altmattstrasse 1B, 6418 Rothenthurm, Switzerland.

Participating institutions e.g.: 

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Silver Spring, MD;  GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, UK;  Terry Fox Laboratory-BC Cancer, Canada;  Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland;  Schwiete-Laboratory Microbiota and Inflammation, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin (DRFZ), a Leibniz Institute, Germany;  MedImmune, an AstraZeneca Company, Gaithersburg, MD;  Biogen, Acute Neurology, Cambridge, MA;  Novo Nordisk Center for Stem Cell Biology; Copenhagen, Denmark; Cardiff University, UK;  Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY;  Genentech, San Francisco, CA;  Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ;  University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Finland;  Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Germany;  Eurofins Pharma Bioanalysis Services UK Ltd, UK;  University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL;  BD Biosciences, California; University of Cambridge, UK;  Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), Leipzig, Germany;  King's College London, UK;  The University of Tokyo;  Dana-Faber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA;  National Institute of Health (NIH), MD;  Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel;  Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA;  TTP plc, UK;  TU München, Germany;  Amerimmune, Fairfax, VA; University of São Paulo, Brazil;  VIB Center for Inflammation Research, Belgium; The University of Sydney and Centenary Institute, Australia;  Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA;  Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, NY;  Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI, Leipzig, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Cytometry; Quality Assurance; Reproducibility; FDA; EMA; NIST; Assurance of Clonality; Single Cells; Monoclonality

DOI:10.1002/cyto.a.23777

 

Disruption of Redox Balance Enhances the Effects of BRAF-inhibition in Melanoma Cells.

Paudel BB1,2 et al.

1Department of Biochemistry & 2Quantitative Systems Biology Center (QSBC) , Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Fluorescence microscopy; Systems biology, Redox capacity, Reactive oxygen species (ROS); CellRox TM DeepRed; Drug combination assay; High-content imaging

DOI:10.1101/818989

 

Gene Editing in Primary Cells of Cattle and Pig.

Vochozkova P1 et al.

1Institute for Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

CRISPR/Cas; Primary cells; Single cell clones; gRNA

DOI:10.1007/978-1-4939-9170-9_17

 

High-Throughput Phenotyping Toolkit for Characterizing Cellular Models of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy In Vitro.

Mosqueira D1 et al.

1Department of Stem Cell Biology, Centre of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiomyocytes; Cellular models; Disease modelling; Drug screening; High-content imaging; High-throughput; Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; Hypertrophy; Mitochondrial respiration; Phenotyping; Mitochondria

DOI:10.3390/mps2040083

 

Induction of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells by miR-493-3p directly targeting AKT2, STK38L, HMGA2, ETS1 and E2F5.

Kleemann M1,2 et al.

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology, University of Applied Sciences Biberach, Germany.

2Faculty of Medicine, University of Ulm, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Ovarian cancer; MicroRNA; RAF1; Apoptosis; Signalling pathways; Targets; High-throughput; Confluence

DOI: 10.1007/s00018-018-2958-x

 

Inhibition of Rho-associated kinases suppresses cardiac myofibroblast function in engineered connective and heart muscle tissues.

Santos GL1 et al.

1Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany; Randall Centre for Cell and Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, London, UK; DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research) Partner Site, Göttingen, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac fibrosis; Myofibroblasts; Neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCF)Proliferation assay over time; Hoechst; FITC-phalloidin; High-content imaging

DOI:10.1016/j.yjmcc.2019.06.015

 

Leveraging Mathematical Modeling to Quantify Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Pathways: Equivalent Dose Metric.

McKenna MT1,2 et al.

1Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Doxorubicin; Mathematical modeling; Pharmacodynamics; Pharmacokinetic modeling; Treatment response; Dose response; Fluorescence; High-content imaging

DOI:10.3389/fphys.2019.00616

 

Methods for Estimating the Probability of Clonality in Cell Line Development.

Chen C1 et al.

1Amgen Inc., Drug Substance Technologies, Process Development, CA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Cell line development (CLD); Clonality; Cell imaging; Limiting dilution; Probability of clonality; Single cell cloning (SCC)

DOI:10.1002/biot.201900289

 

Monoclonal Antibody AP3 Binds Galactomannan Antigens Displayed by the Pathogens Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, and A. parasiticus.

Schubert M1 et al.

1Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME, Department of Plant Biotechnology, Aachen, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Aspergillus antigen; Detection assay; Epitope identification; Galactofuranose; Glycobiology; Limited dilution; B-lymphocytes fused to myelomaHybridoma cells; Antibody generation; IgG; 

DOI:10.3389/fcimb.2019.00234

 

Perfusion process combining low temperature and valeric acid for enhanced recombinant factor VIII production.

Coronel J1, Heinrich C2, Klausing S2, Noll T3, Figueredo-Cardero A4, Castilho LR1.

1Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), COPPE, Cell Culture Engineering Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

2Xell AG, Alte Verler Straße 1, Bielefeld, Germany.

3Bielefeld University, Institute of Cell Culture Technology, Universitätsstraße 25, Bielefeld, Germany.

4Fiocruz, Bio-Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

KEYWORDS:

CHO perfusion cultivation; Mild hypothermia; Productivity; Recombinant factor VIII; Valeric acid; Single cell cloning (SCC)

DOI:10.1002/btpr.2915

 

2018

A single-step FACS sorting strategy in conjunction with fluorescent vital dye imaging efficiently assures clonality of biopharmaceutical production cell lines.

Fieder J1 et al.

1Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH & Co. KG, Early Stage Bioprocess Development, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Biopharmaceutical production cell line; Assurance of clonality; FACS; Imaging; Single cell cloning; SCC; Calcein; FASCC

DOI:10.1002/biot.201700002

 

Antitumor activity of kinetochore-associated protein 2 siRNA against lung cancer patient-derived tumor xenografts.

Makita Y1 et al.

1Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, Pharmaceutical Research Division, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 251-8555, Japan.

KEYWORDS:

Erlotinib; Kinetochore-associated Protein 2; Lipid Nanoparticle; Lung Cancer; Patient-derived Tumor Xenograft; Short interfering RNA; siRNA; Three-dimensional Culture; 3D

DOI:10.3892/ol.2018.7890

 

Adhesion of Megasphaera cerevisiae onto solid surfaces mimicking materials used in breweries.

Bittner M1 et al.

1University of Chemistry and Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Prague, Czech Republic.

KEYWORDS:

Megasphaera sp; Cell adhesion; Solid surfaces; Surface interaction; XDLVO theory; Brewery

DOI:10.1002/jib.415

 

Comprehensive manipulation of glycosylation profiles across development scales.

Loebrich S1 et al.

1ImmunoGen, Cell Line and Upstream Process Development & Technical Operations, Waltham , USA.

KEYWORDS:

ADC; DoE; Feed additives; Fed-batch; Media development; Multivariate analysis; Product quality; Scalability; Monoclonal antibodies (mAB); Glycosylation; Trypan blue; 24-w deepwell plates

DOI:10.1080/19420862.2018.1527665

 

Early integration of Design of Experiment (DOE) and multivariate statistics identifies feeding regimens suitable for CHO cell line development and screening.

Mora A1,2 et al.

1AbbVie Bioresearch Center, Process Sciences Department, Worcester, MA, USA.

2Francis College of Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Cell line development; Chinese hamster ovary (CHO); Design of experiment; Feed medium; Multivariate data analysis; Viability; Trypan blue; Fed-batch; 24-deep well plates

DOI:10.1007/s10616-019-00350-1

 

High-throughput screening of antibody-expressing CHO clones using an automated shaken deep-well system.

Wang B1 et al.

1MedImmune, Cell Culture and Fermentation Sciences, Biopharmaceutical Development, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

KEYWORDS:

Automation; Cell imaging; Cell line development (CLD); Hamilton/96DW process; Single-cell cloning (SCC); Monoclonality; mAB; Protein production; High-throughput screening; Trypan blue

DOI:10.1002/btpr.2721

 

Impact of nanoparticle surface functionalization on the protein corona and cellular adhesion, uptake and transport.

Ashraf Abdelkhaliq1 et al.

1RIKILT-Wageningen Research, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen, The Netherlands

KEYWORDS: Nanoparticles; High throughput screening; Cellular adhesion and uptake; Label-free LC–MS/MS; Quantitative proteomics

DOI:10.1186/s12951-018-0394-6

 

Infrared attenuated total reflection and 2D fluorescence spectroscopy for the discrimination of differently aggregated monoclonal antibodies.

Handl A 1 et al.

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Fluorescence microscopy; Fluorescent dyes; Monoclonal antibody (mAB); IgG; Protein aggregation; Bis-ANS; High-content imaging

DOI:10.1039/c9an00424f

 

Liver metastasis of pancreatic cancer: the hepatic microenvironment impacts differentiation and self-renewal capacity of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells.

Knaack H1 et al.

1Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel (CAU) and UKSH Campus Kiel, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer stem cell; Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition; Hepatic microenvironment; Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma; Non-invasive cell confluence; Single cell cloning; Clone expansion

DOI:10.18632/oncotarget.25884

 

Microglia support neural stem cell maintenance and growth.

Matsui TK1, Mori E2.

1Department of Future Basic Medicine & Department of Neurology, Nara Medical University, Japan.

2Department of Future Basic Medicine, Nara Medical University, Japan.

KEYWORDS:

Brain development; Central nervous system; Microglia; Neural stem/progenitor cell

DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2018.07.130

 

MiR-744-5p inducing cell death by directly targeting HNRNPC and NFIX in ovarian cancer cells.

Kleemann M1,2 et al.

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology, University of Applied Sciences Biberach, Germany.

2Faculty of Medicine, University of Ulm, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Cisplatin resistant; MicroRNA (miRNA); Apoptosis; Signaling pathway; Intrinsic apoptotic pathway; Non-invasive cell confluence; Cell death; Ovarian cancer; Target analysis; miR-217-5p; Adherent cell culture; SKOV3; OVCAR3; siRNA death control (DT); Etoposide; Paclitaxel

DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-27438-6

 

Resveratrol, pterostilbene, and baicalein: plant-derived anti-biofilm agents.

Kolouchová I1 et al.

1University of Chemistry and Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Prague, Czech Republic.

KEYWORDS:

Adhesion; Baicalein; Biofilm; Eradication; Pterostilbene; Resveratrol; Cell adhesion; Solid surfaces; Surface interaction; 

DOI:10.1007/s12223-017-0549-0

 

Transparent Nanopore Cavity Arrays Enable Highly Parallelized Optical Studies of Single Membrane Proteins on Chip.

Diederichs T1 et al.

1Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Silicon-on-insulator chips; Membrane proteins; Microcavities; Nanopores; Optical readout; Supported lipid bilayers; Transport kinetics; Membrane-on-a-chip; Membrane transport; Microstructured Si/SiO2 chip;

DOI:10.1021/acs.nanolett.8b01252

 

Variable Cell Line Pharmacokinetics Contribute to Non-Linear Treatment Response in Heterogeneous Cell Populations.

McKenna MT1,2 et al.

1Vanderbilt University, Institute of Imaging Science & 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nashville, TN, United States.

KEYWORDS:

Mathematical modeling; Oncology; Pharmacology; Pharmacodynamics; Pharmacokinetic modeling; Treatment response; Dose response; Fluorescence; High-content imaging; Nuclei; Cell-population over time

DOI:10.1007/s10439-018-2001-2

 

Visualisation of intracellular production bottlenecks in suspension-adapted CHO cells producing complex biopharmaceuticals using fluorescence microscopy.

Mathias S1 et al.

1University of Applied Sciences Biberach, Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Germany. 

KEYWORDS:

Bispecific antibody production; CHO cell line engineering; Difficult-to-express proteins; Production bottleneck; Secretory pathway; Fed-batch; Immunocytochemistry; High-content analysis; Evaluation of the intracellular distribution of the synthesised IgG

DOI:10.1016/j.jbiotec.2018.02.009

 

2017

A Predictive Mathematical Modeling Approach for the Study of Doxorubicin Treatment in Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

McKenna MT 1 et al.

1Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science & Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nashville, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Doxorubicin; Treatment response studies; Fluorescence microscopy; 20x Lens; Predictive Mathematical Modeling Approach

DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-05902-z

 

A single-step FACS sorting strategy in conjunction with fluorescent vital dye imaging efficiently assures clonality of biopharmaceutical production cell lines.

Fieder J1 et al.

1Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH & Co. KG, Early Stage Bioprocess Development, Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH & Co. KG, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Biopharmaceutical production cell line; Clonality; FACS; Imaging; SCC; FASCC; CLD

DOI:10.1002/biot.201700002

 

Activation of the STING-Dependent Type I Interferon Response Reduces Microglial Reactivity and Neuroinflammation.

Mathur V1 et al.

1Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, CA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

STING; Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; Ganciclovir; Microglia; Neuroinflammation; Type I interferon response; Toxicity; Celltox Green; Cell confluence

DOI:10.1016/j.neuron.2017.11.032

 

Bone morphogenetic protein and retinoic acid synergistically specify female germ-cell fate in mice.

Miyauchi H1 et al.

1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

KEYWORDS:

CiRA; Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); Female germ‐cell fate; Meiosis; Primordial germ cell‐like cells; Retinoic acid; GFP; Alexa Fluor 633; (PGCs)/PGC-like cells (PGCLCs); Embryonic stem cells (ESCs)

DOI:10.15252/embj.201796875

 

Cell-impedance-based label-free technology for the identification of new drugs.

Lundstrom K1

1PanTherapeutics, Lutry, Switzerland.

KEYWORDS:

Label-free; Cell-impedance-based; Screening assays; Dose-response; High-content; IC50; EC50

DOI:10.1080/17460441.2017.1297419

 

Dependence On Glycolysis Sensitizes BRAF-mutated Melanomas For Increased Response To Targeted BRAF Inhibition.

Hardeman KN1 et al.

1Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Melanoma; Skin cancer; Drug treatment; Proliferation; Dose response; Glycolysis Sensitizes BRAF-mutated Melanomas; BRAF inhibition

DOI:10.1038/srep42604

 

Development of a high-throughput platform to support cell culture media and feed screening.

Lu J1 et al.

1BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Cell Culture Process Development, Novato, CA 94949, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Viability; Trypan blue; NYONE identical cell growth ranking as Vi-Cell XR; Deep well plates (DWP); CLD; AMBR15; Freedom EVO liquid handler system; BioHT metabolic analyzer

DOI:10.1186/s12919-018-0097-x

 

Enhanced production of recombinant proteins by a small molecule protein synthesis enhancer in combination with an antioxidant in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells.

Camire J1 et al.

1GE Healthcare, Logan, UT, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidants; Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell; Process optimization; Recombinant protein production; Small molecule enhancers; Trypan blue; Apoptosis

DOI:10.1007/s00449-017-1767-1

 

Establishment of a fully automated microtiter plate-based system for suspension cell culture and its application for enhanced process optimization.

Markert S1 et al.

1Roche Diagnostics GmbH-Pharmaceutical Biotech Production and Development, Nonnenwald 2, 82377 Penzberg, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Biopharmaceutical drug development; Fed-batch CHO suspension cultures; High-throughput process optimization; Industrial cell culture automation; Scale up prediction; Shaken microtiter plate

DOI:10.1002/bit.26044

 

Extracellular Matrix/Integrin Signaling Promotes Resistance to Combined Inhibition of HER2 and PI3K in HER2+ Breast Cancer.

Hanker AB1 et al.

1Department of Medicine & Breast Cancer Program, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; HER2+; Trastuzumab; Pertuzumab; Cell Viability Imaging Kit; Proliferation

DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-2808

 

Generating monoclonal production cell lines with ≥ 99.9 % probability.

Paul AJ1 et al.

1Sartorius Stedim Cellca GmbH, 88471 Laupheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Biopharmaceutical production cell line; Clonality; FACS; Imaging; Single cell cloning (SCC); CLD; IgG; Viability; Cell aggregation levels 

DOI:10.1186/s12919-018-0097-x

 

High throughput analysis of antibody glycosylation in cell culture samples.

Giehring S1 et al.

1PAIA Biotech GmbH, Cologne, D-51105, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

PAIAplate; IgG; Bead-based assays; Bioprocess development; Cell line development (CLD); Fc and Fab glycosylation; High-throughput assays; Lectins; Monoclonal antibodies; Product quality; Titer assay; mAB

DOI:10.1186/s12919-018-0097-x

 

High-throughput analysis of sub-visible mAb aggregate particles using automated fluorescence microscopy imaging.

Paul AJ1 et al.

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Automatization; Fluorescence microscopy; Fluorescent dyes; Monoclonal antibody; Protein aggregation; Bis-ANS; High-content imaging

DOI:10.1007/s00216-017-0362-2

 

Identification of a novel miRNA that increases transient protein expression in combination with valproic acid.

Meyer HJ1 et al.

1Genentech, Dept. of Early Stage Cell Culture & Dept. of Discovery Oncology, South San Francisco, CA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

HEK293; Antibody expression; miRNA; Protein production; Transient transfection; Valproic acid; Cell viability

DOI:10.1002/btpr.2488

 

Identification of process conditions influencing protein aggregation in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture.

Paul AJ1 et al.

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

CHO cells; Bioprocess engineering; Monoclonal antibodies (mAB); Protein aggregation; Automatization; Fluorescence microscopy; Bis-ANS; High-content imaging

DOI:10.1002/bit.26534

 

In vitro expansion of mouse primordial germ cell-like cells recapitulates an epigenetic blank slate.

Ohta H1 et al.

1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan

KEYWORDS:

CiRA; Imaging cells on feeder layer; PGCLC proliferation; Embryonic stem cells (ESCs); Forskolin; Chemical library screening

DOI:10.15252/embj.201695862

 

Leveraging a CHO cell line toolkit to accelerate biotherapeutics into the clinic.

Wright C1 et al.

1Biogen, Technical Development, Cambridge, MA.

KEYWORDS:

CHO; Cell line engineering; Early cell line development; Product quality; CLD; Monoclonality; High-throughput imaging

DOI:10.1007/s12079-017-0410-x

 

miR-217-5p induces apoptosis by directly targeting PRKCI, BAG3, ITGAV and MAPK1 in colorectal cancer cells.

Flum M1,2 et al.

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology, University of Applied Sciences Biberach, Germany.

2Faculty of Medicine, University of Ulm, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

MicroRNA (miRNA); Apoptosis; siRNA death control (DT); Non-invasive cell confluence; Cell death; Colorectal cancer; Target analysis; miR-217-5p; Adherent cell culture; miRNA mimic transfection

DOI:10.1007/s12079-017-0410-x

 

miRNA engineering of CHO cells facilitates production of difficult-to-express proteins and increases success in cell line development.

Fischer S1,2 et al.

1Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH & Co. KG, Early Stage Bioprocess Development, Biberach, Germany.

2Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH & Co. KG, Cell Culture Development CMB, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells; Cell engineering; Difficult-to-express proteins; miR-557; microRNA; Monoclonal antibody (mAB); Cell line development (CLD); SCC; Monoclonality

DOI:10.1002/bit.26280

 

Phenolic compounds of Triplaris gardneriana can protect cells against oxidative stress and restore oxidative balance.

de Almeida TS1 et al.

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Federal University of Ceará, 60020-181, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.

KEYWORDS:

Cell imaging; DPPH; MCF-7 cells; Medicinal plant; TBARS; CellROX Deep Red; SC50; IC50; ROS; Hoechst; Nuclear counterstain

DOI:10.1016/j.biopha.2017.07.050

 

Synergistic action of amphotericin B and rhamnolipid in combination on Candida parapsilosis and Trichosporon cutaneum.

Matatkova O1 et al.

1 Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Prague, Czech Republic.

KEYWORDS:

Biofilm; Candida sp.; Trichosporon sp.; Rhamnolipid; Amphotericin B; Drugs interaction 

DOI:10.1007/s11696-017-0141-8

 

2016

Adhesion of Megasphaera cerevisiae onto solid surfaces mimicking materials used in breweries.

Bittner M1 et al.

1University of Chemistry and Technology, Department of Biotechnology, Prague, Czech Republic.

KEYWORDS:

Megasphaera sp; Cell adhesion; Solid surfaces; Surface interaction; XDLVO theory; Brewery

DOI:10.1002/jib.415

 

Functional Subclone Profiling for Prediction of Treatment-Induced Intratumor Population Shifts and Discovery of Rational Drug Combinations in Human Glioblastoma.

Reinartz R1,2 et al.

1Stem Cell Pathologies, University of Bonn Medical Center, Bonn, Germany.

2Institute of Reconstructive Neurobiology, University of Bonn Medical Center, Bonn, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Human glioblastoma; Derivation of tumor subclones; Cell morphology measurement; Compound screening; Drug–response profiles; IC50

DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-15-2089

 

Genetic mutation analysis at early stages of cell line development using next generation sequencing.

Wright C1 et al.

1Biogen, Cell Culture Development, Cambridge, MA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

CHO cells; Amplicon sequencing; Early stage cell line development (CLD); Mutation detection; FASCC; Monoclonal cell lines; Clonality

DOI:10.1002/btpr.2263

 

Identification of a thalidomide derivative that selectively targets tumorigenic liver progenitor cells and comparing its effects with lenalidomide and sorafenib.

Woo K1 et al.

1The Centre for Medical Research, The Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia.

KEYWORDS:

Analogues; Apoptosis; Lenalidomide; Liver cancer; Mitosis; Progenitor cells; Sorafenib; Thalidomide

DOI:10.1016/j.ejmech.2016.03.015

 

Membrane Transport Processes Analyzed by a Highly Parallel Nanopore Chip System at Single Protein Resolution.

Urban M1 et al.

1Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Model lipid bilayers; Pore-spanning membrane; Nanopores; Suspended bilayer; Lab-on-chip, Biosensor; Membrane proteins; Microcavities; Nanopores; Optical readout; Supported lipid bilayers; Transport kinetics; Membrane-on-a-chip; Microstructured Si/SiO2 chip

DOI:10.3791/53373

 

Network-driven plasma proteomics expose molecular changes in the Alzheimer's brain.

Jaeger PA1,2,3 et al.

1Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA. pjaeger@ucsd.edu.

2Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

3Departments of Bioengineering and Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Growth-differentiation factor (GDF); Alzheimer’s disease (AD); Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU); Neural progenitor cells (NPC); eGFP; Proliferation

DOI:10.1186/s13024-016-0095-2

 

2015

Adult hippocampal neural stem and progenitor cells regulate the neurogenic niche by secreting VEGF.

Kirby ED1 et al.

1Stanford University, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and Center for Tissue Regeneration, Repair, and Restoration, CA, USA

KEYWORDS:

Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs); Immunostaining; Immunocytochemistry (ICC); Adult neurogenesis; Hippocampus; Neural precursor; Stem cell; Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

DOI:10.1073/pnas.1422448112

 

Assurance of monoclonality in one round of cloning through cell sorting for single cell deposition coupled with high resolution cell imaging.

Evans K1 et al.

1MedImmune, Cell Culture and Fermentation Sciences, Biopharmaceutical Development, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

KEYWORDS:

Cell imaging; Cell line development (CLD); Flow cytometry; Mammalian cell culture; Single-cell cloning (SCC); Monoclonality; mAB; Protein production; Limited dilution; Single cell deposition; International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical
Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH); United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA); CHO suspension cell line

DOI:10.1002/btpr.2145

 

Biomek Cell Workstation: A Variable System for Automated Cell Cultivation.

Lehmann R1 et al.

1Center for Life Science Automation (celisca), University of Rostock, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Biomek Cell Workstation; Automated cell culturing; Life science automation; Suspension cells; High-content screening (HCS); Liquid handling

DOI:10.1177/2211068215599786

 

CMV promoter mutants with a reduced propensity to productivity loss in CHO cells.

Moritz B1, Becker PB2, Göpfert U1.

1Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Large Molecule Research, Penzberg, Germany.

2Biomedical Center and Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Transfection ; Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV-MIE); CHO cells; Recombinant gene expression; Production of therapeutic antibodies; CLD; Cell density; Viability of mammalian cell culture

DOI:10.1038/srep16952

 

Evaluation of baicalein, chitosan and usnic acid effect on Candida parapsilosis and Candida krusei biofilm using a Cellavista device.

Kvasnickova E1 et al.

1Department of Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, Czech Republic.

KEYWORDS:

Baicalein; Antifungal/anti-biofilm activity; Candida krusei; Candida parapsilosis; Chitosan; Eradication; Antimicrobial agents; Inhibition; 96-well format

DOI:10.1016/j.mimet.2015.09.002

 

Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (GOLPH2) is a novel bile acid-responsive modulator of oesophageal cell migration and invasion.

Byrne AM1 et al.

1Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.

KEYWORDS:

Bile acids; Golgi; Barrett’s oesophagus; Oesophageal cancer; GOLPH2; Adenocarcinoma; siRNA; Scratch wound-healing assay; Wound closure %

DOI:10.1038/bjc.2015.350

 

Identification of process parameters influencing product quality in mammalian cell culture.

Paul AJ1 and Hesse F1

1Institute of Applied Biotechnology (IAB), Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Biberach, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Product quality; mAb aggregates; CHO DG44 cells; Bis-ANS; Protein aggregation

DOI:10.1186/1753-6561-9-S9-O4

 

Response of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells carrying PIK3CA mutations to selected targeted therapies.

Wirtz ED1, Hoshino D2, Maldonado AT3, Tyson DR3, Weaver AM3.

1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.

2Kanagawa Cancer Center, Division of Cancer Cell Research, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.

3Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Tumor; Head and Neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); PIK3CA mutation; IC50; Oncogenes; Cell Viability;
Calcein; Hoechst; Propidium iodide

DOI:10.1001/jamaoto.2015.0471

 

2014

A high-throughput screen for teratogens using human pluripotent stem cells.

Kameoka S1, Babiarz J1, Kolaja K1, Chiao E2

1Hoffmann-La Roche, Early and Investigative Safety, Nonclinical Safety, New Jersey, USA

2Biogen Idec, 14 Cambridge Center, Bld., Cambridge, USA

KEYWORDS:

Human cell-based assays; Human pluripotent stem cell test (hPST); Preclinical toxicology teratogenicity studies; Environmental toxicants; High-throughput screening (HTS)

DOI:10.1093/toxsci/kft239

 

Antiviral drug ganciclovir is a potent inhibitor of microglial proliferation and neuroinflammation.

Ding Z1 et al.

1Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology; Stanford, CA; USA

KEYWORDS:

Central nervous system (CNS); experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE); Ganciclovir (GCV); Glial
fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); Multiple sclerosis (MS); Neuroinflammation; Neurodegenerative diseases; Microglia

DOI:10.1084/jem.20120696

 

Development of a semi-automated high throughput transient transfection system.

Bos AB1 et al.

1Department of Early Stage Cell Culture, Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Transient transfection; High throughput (HT); Tubespins; Automation; Protein expression systems; HEK293T; Proof of concept, Antibody development; Biological structure and functional analysis; human IgG1 (hu IgG1)

DOI:10.1016/j.jbiotec.2014.03.027

 

Increased adipogenesis of human adipose-derived stem cells on polycaprolactone fiber matrices.

Brännmark C1 et al.

1Reagent and Assay Development Discovery Sciences R&D, Astra Zeneca, Mölndal, Sweden.

KEYWORDS:

Obesity; Type 2 diabetes; Human adipose derived stem cells; differentiated adipocytes; in vitro; PCL fiber plates (Nanofiber Solutions)

DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0113620

 

Membrane-on-a-chip: microstructured silicon/silicon-dioxide chips for high-throughput screening of membrane transport and viral membrane fusion.

Kusters I1 et al.

1Department of Microbiology, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute and the Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

KEYWORDS:

Membrane-on-a-chip; GUV; HTS; Membrane transport; microstructured Si/SiO2 chip; Transport kinetics; Single-membrane channels; Micropore array; Suspended lipid bilayers; Virus fusion; Hemolysin

DOI:10.1021/nn405884a

 

2013

Anticancer effects of niclosamide in human glioblastoma.

Wieland A1 et al.

1Stem Cell Pathologies, Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn Medical Center, Bonn, Germany.

KEYWORDS:

Primary human Glioblastoma; Brain tumor; Cancer research; Niclosamide; Clinical development; Cytotoxicity; Dose response; Cell-cycle progression; Apoptosis; Cell migration & Proliferation; Co-culture experiments; Lentiviral transduction

DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-2895

 

Co-expression network analysis identifies Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (SYK) as a candidate oncogenic driver in a subset of small-cell lung cancer.

Udyavar AR1 et al.

1Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (SYK); Biomarker; Potential therapeutic target; Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC); Live/Dead assay; Viability

DOI:10.1186/1752-0509-7-S5-S1

 

Deriving dopaminergic neurons for clinical use. A practical approach.

Gonzalez R1 et al.

1International Stem Cell Corporation, 5950 Priestly Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Neural stem cells (NSCs); Parkinson’s disease (PD); Substantia nigra (SN); Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs); Blood brain barrier; NB medium (NeuroBasal medium); Measuring neurite density

DOI:10.1001/jamaoto.2015.0471

 

Permeation through phospholipid bilayers, skin-cell penetration, plasma stability, and CD spectra of α- and β-oligoproline derivatives.

Kolesinska B1 et al.

1Laboratorium für Organische Chemie, Departement Chemie und Angewandte Biowissenschaften, ETH-Zürich, Switzerland.

KEYWORDS:

Membrane-on-a-chip; nanoFAST Biochip; GUV; HTS; Membrane transport; Microstructured Si/SiO2 chip; Micropore array; Transport kinetics; Single-membrane channels; Suspended lipid bilayers; Proline; Inverted Microscopy; High-content 20x

DOI:10.1002/cbdv.201200393

 

2012

Application of MultiStem® Allogeneic Cells for Immunomodulatory Therapy: Clinical Progress and Pre-Clinical Challenges in Prophylaxis for Graft Versus Host Disease.

Vaes B1 et al.

1ReGenesys BVBA Heverlee, Belgium.

KEYWORDS:

GvHD prophylaxis; MultiStem cells; Adherent stem cells; Bioreactor; Regenerative medicine; Cell morphology measurement

DOI:10.3389/fimmu.2012.00345

 

Neural progenitor cells regulate microglia functions and activity.

Mosher KI1 et al.

1Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.

KEYWORDS:

Neural progenitor cells (NPCs); Microglia proliferation; CNS trauma or disease; Chemotaxis assay; Filter assay; Transwell assay; Hoechst 33342

DOI:10.1038/nn.3233

 

2011

Development of a novel automated cell isolation, expansion, and characterization platform.

Franscini N1 et al.

1Institute of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Wädenswil, Switzerland.

KEYWORDS:

Automated cellculture platform; Liquid handling; Human primary intervertebral disc cells; Cell isolation; Cell expansion; Cell characterization; RoboFlasks; Glass chamber slides

DOI:10.1016/j.jala.2011.01.002

 

Generation of hyaline cartilaginous tissue from mouse adult dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors.

Hiramatsu K1 et al.

1Department of Bone and Cartilage Biology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan.

KEYWORDS:

iPS cells; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Polygonal chondrogenic cells; Cartilage injury; Hyaline cartilage; Chondrocytes; Chondrogenic factor; SOX9; CiRA; Anti Collagen immuno-staining

DOI:10.1172/JCI44605

 

The complete automation of cell culture: improvements for high-throughput and high-content screening.

Jain S1 et al.

1VUMC-Clinical Genetics, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

KEYWORDS:

Automation; Robotics; Cell-based assays; CNS and PNS diseases; Genomics; High-content screening; HCS; High-throughput; HT; Liquid handling

DOI:10.1177/1087057111413920

 

Lab-Automation Partners

ThermoFisher, Beckman Coulter, Caliper, Hamilton, paa, Tecan, Perkin Elmer

Beckman Coulter Device List Automation Partners

(HIGH CONTENT IMAGING + CELL LINE DEVELOPMENT)